George Legrady | Introductory Presentation by Bryant Austin

Friday, October 12, 2018 at 7:30 pm 

San Francisco Art Institute Osher Lecture Hall
800 Chestnut Street
San Francisco, Ca

George Legrady will present a selection of his photographic-based works as they evolved from analog to digital, from the still-image to computational-generated interactive digital media installations. 

Legrady is currently a Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Director of the Experimental Visualization Lab in the Media Arts & Technology graduate program. He is also currently a researcher at the Institut des mines-telecom, Paristech, and professorial fellow in the iCinema Lab at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He received an MFA in Photography from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1976.

His work has been featured internationally in gallery/museum exhibitions, print and electronic publications, and public commissions. His “Making Visible the Invisible” data visualization commissioned by the Seattle Public Library in 2005 continues to feature by the hour patrons’ checkouts on six large screens. 

His practice and research have been supported by the National Endowment of the Arts, Creative Capital Foundation, National Science Foundation, the Canada Council for the Arts, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and others.

© George Legrady Blink (2006) {A software generated animation that consists of a matrix of eyes that open and close by taking stock of their neighbors’ actions. Sometimes they want to be like their neighbors other times they decide against it}

Tickets also available at the door beginning at 7:00 pm

Suggested Donation: $15.00 general admission, Students with ID: Free


Noise to Signal – From analog to digital, a photographic perspective  (1975-2018)

George Legrady Studio Website

© George Legrady George lifting weights with the Cree, 1973

James Bay Cree Documentary
A photographic document of everyday life in 4 James Bay Cree Indian coastal settlements in sub-arctic Canada at the time of their legal battle against the James Bay Hydro-Electric Corporation, resulting in an archive of 2800 images that represented a personalized but systematic documentation of Cree indigenous culture: rituals, housing, hunting, people, interaction with nature, the transition to Western ways, etc.

© George Legrady

James Bay Cree Documentary
A photographic document of everyday life in 4 James Bay Cree Indian coastal settlements in sub-arctic Canada at the time of their legal battle against the James Bay Hydro-Electric Corporation, resulting in an archive of 2800 images that represented a personalized but systematic documentation of Cree indigenous culture: rituals, housing, hunting, people, interaction with nature, the transition to Western ways, etc.

 © George Legrady  AutoVision  (2014)  Exquisite Vision (2014)  An installation consisting of 3 robotic cameras on rails in a gallery searching for “scenes of interest”. When their gaze crosses, they take a photo and assemble them in a virtual 3D reconstruction of the space.   https://vimeo.com/109427560

© George Legrady AutoVision (2014)
Exquisite Vision (2014) An installation consisting of 3 robotic cameras on rails in a gallery searching for “scenes of interest”. When their gaze crosses, they take a photo and assemble them in a virtual 3D reconstruction of the space. https://vimeo.com/109427560

© George Legrady Decor (1984)

© George Legrady Making Visible the Invisible, Seattle Public Library (2005-current)

© George Legrady polypTelic: The Ising Model (2004-2008)

https://vimeo.com/257847233

© George Legrady

{Applied custom software to an old photograph - uses 2 sinewaves modulating the image details resulting in this} (2018)

© George Legrady Day & Night (2015) { large scale lenticular oscillates between a 1938 photograph of a party of cosmopolitan city people from Budapest on a week-end trip to Transylvania. The image oscillates to a full moon in my backyard in Santa Barbara } https://vimeo.com/141513911

 

© George Legrady Stardust (2008) {Ten 3D lenticular panels created by inputting planetary location of stars into a 3D architecture software and adding energy to each of the stars. The data is from the Spitzer Science Center at Caltech }


Bryant Austin

 Everything I create expresses an awareness that every photograph taken throughout history is a self-portrait of the cosmos. It is this feeling of connectedness that I seek to convey through every photograph. My new work reveals the sun’s surface in vivid detail, as viewed through Earth’s varied atmospheric states. Dramatic landscape elements anchor the experience to challenge our perceptions of reality and our place within an infinite void. The process is complex and often requires the use of three telescopes equipped with infrared cameras and a monochrome video camera with scientific filters. This equipment is often backpacked in the Sierras to capture Sun/Earth interactions that occur only a few moments each year.

Bryant Austin is an American photographer known for his life-size portraits of whales. These highly detailed portraits range in sizes from four by six feet to full-body composites as large as eight by thirty six feet. His work remains unrivaled and serves as a critical archive for future generations, given the tenuous future of many whale species.

 His current focus is with the sun, its relationship to Earth, and how photons fall on our planet. Every body of work Austin creates is completely original and requires innovating new techniques and approaches to his subjects.

Bryant Austin’s photographs have been exhibited in solo shows in the U.S. and abroad, including the Monterey Museum of Art (Monterey, California), Focus Gallery (Chatham, Massachusetts), Tamada Museum (Tokyo, Japan), and the USA Gallery at the Australian National Maritime Museum (Sydney, Australia). Recent group shows include the Peabody-Essex Museum (Salem, Massachusetts), the photo-eye Gallery (Santa Fe, New Mexico).

Bryant’s work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, and Reuters, among others. He is also a nominee for the 2019 SFMOMA SECA Award.

Bryant was born in Sacramento, CA, in 1969 and currently resides both in Walnut Creek and Carmel, CA. His first photography book, Beautiful Whale, was released in 2013 by Abrams Books. 

Interview with Bryant by Anne Kelly Gallery Director,  photo-eye Gallery, Sante Fe, NM

Bryant Austin - Behind the Scenes - Oceana.jpg
Bryant Austin - Behind the Scenes.jpg
 
 

© Bryant Austin

© Bryant Austin

 © Bryant Austin

© Bryant Austin

 © Bryant Austin

© Bryant Austin

 © Bryant Austin

© Bryant Austin

 © Bryant Austin

© Bryant Austin

© Bryant Austin

 © Bryant Austin

© Bryant Austin

Tickets also available at the door beginning at 7:00 pm

Suggested Donation: $15.00 general admission, Students with ID: Free